Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8

Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8


Triumph Spitfire Cars ~ Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8
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Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8

With the Engine and Gearbox safely removed it was time to get on with removing everything else which is bolted, screwed, stuck or attached in some method to the body and chassis.

The brake and clutch master cylinders were carefully disconnected from their copper pipes, I am not sure at the moment whether to buy new master cylinders or buy a seal kit for the old ones, it will probably depend upon what they look like once I strip them down. With the master cylinders out if the way the pipes were removed without too much care and in some places just cut through as I will be replacing them with a new pipe kit.

The wiring loom was removed throughout the car taking great care to photo and label all the connections as the loom looks in quite good order and because finances are limited it will be reused after a good clean and all the connectivity checked through.

I have read 2 different books on Spitfire Restoration Cars and had comments from loads of people, some say never take the body off the chassis before completing the repairs to the body others say you are OK to take it off as long as the body is supported.

I decided the best way for me (only having a single garage) was to support the body and remove it so that the chassis could be repaired and then the chassis could be moved to the side of the house and covered until required.


Related : Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8 By Guide ~ Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 8, Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7

Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7


Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7 ~ Triumph Spitfire Cars
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Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7

The carpet had already been removed so the only items to be removed were the centre console and the Gearbox Tunnel Cover. These came out easily although the gearbox tunnel cover is a bit damaged being the original cardboard type and I will probably replace it with a fibreglass type.

With these items removed I could get access to the Speedo and rev counter cables and remove them. Next to be disconnected was the prop shaft and the gearbox mounts slackened off.

A lifting crane was brought in and strapped up to the engine. The weight of the engine was taken by the crane and the engine mounts removed. Removing the engine and gearbox was more trouble than I thought as the access was very good but the strapping arrangements we had rigged up was not as good as it could have been and we had to re position the straps a number of times to get the engine/gearbox out with the limited height of the garage.

With the engine and gearbox out I cleaned up the engine bay area of any remaining components such as the brake pipes, wiring loom and master cylinders. The engine and gearbox were stored at the back of the garage to be looked at once the bodywork is done.

Next time I will continue the strip of the components so that the body can be lifted off the chassis.


Related : Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7 By Guide ~ Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 7, Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 6

Triumph Spitfire Cars

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 6


Triumph Spitfire MK IV
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Triumph Spitfire MK IV Cars

Triumph Spitfire Cars MK IV

Restoration Parts 6

The main aim of the next part of the work is to remove various bits and pieces so that I can pull the engine and gearbox. When I first bought the car the first thing I did was change all the water hoses and clips so I removed these first carefully so that I could reuse them once the restoration was complete. As the hoses had only been on for about 6 months these came of nice and easily. With the hoses removed the next job was to take out the radiator which was a real pain, the bolts came out of the radiator without any problems and enabled me to remove the radiator for safe keeping and checking later. The pain was that the support brackets which support the radiator to the chassis would not come off the chassis and they are right in the way so every time you do work in that area you were guaranteed to catch yourself on one of them. I soaked the bolts is loads of penetrating oil and eventually with a little help from a big hammer they gave in and came off.

To make the engine lighter and easier to lift the next job was to take off the engine ancillaries such as the alternator, starter motor, carbs and manifolds. These all came off without any problems and were stored carefully in labelled boxes to be cleaned up and checked at a later date.

Triumph Spitfire Cars
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Triumph Spitfire Cars


With the radiator and engine ancillaries removed there is so much more room so any remaining wires were labelled and any other bits and pieces which could get in the way during the lift (such as the horns) were also removed at this point.


Related : Triumph Spitfire Cars ~ Spitfire Mark IV Part 1
Related : Triumph Spitfire Cars ~ Spitfire Mark IV Part 2

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 5

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 5


Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration
Picture Of

Triumph Spitfire MK IV Car

Triumph Spitfire MK IV

Restoration Parts 5

The bonnet had to be removed for repair of both the bonnet and the front of the chassis. To remove the bonnet the main lights have to be removed, so the wires and loom were labeled (I used inkjet avery labels as the stick to themselves well when wrapped around cables and once written on don't smudge).

Once the lights and cowls are removed the only thing to do is to unbolt the four bolts in the bonnet boxes which are under the over-riders. Although the bonnet is quite large, it was light enough for the wife and I to lift clear and move out of the way.

With the bonnet safely stored out of harms way there is plenty of room to get access to everything. The front quarter panels on the Triumph Spitfire were made of steel, but these have a tendency to rot from the inside out, and a lot of owners have replaced these panels with fiberglass equivalents, as had been done on mine.

There are only four bolts securing each quarter panel to the chassis and these came free without any problems except that on the passenger side the front cross member was like lace and the quarter panel was holding the cross member together.

Next to be removed was the front bumper which attaches with just two bolts at the top of the bonnet boxes. the bumper is not in too good a condition so either a good second hand will be found or I will look at getting mine re chromed.

The last job for january was to remove the wiring loom, This is a slow and tedious job, but if you are going to reuse the loom as I plan to, everything must be well labeled and removed carefully.

In next months article I will write about removing all the ancillary components to facilitate the removal of the engine and gearbox.


Triumph Spitfire Cars Models Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 4

Triumph Spitfire Cars Models Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 4


riumph Spitfire Cars Models Triumph Spitfire MK IV
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Triumph Spitfire MK IV Car

Triumph Spitfire MK IV

Restoration Triumph Cars Parts 4

Let's start the renovation. In this series of articles did not try to teach you how to do things or recommend methods, I will document my experiences and how I wanted to do the things they were right or wrong I am sure that you get something from them.

Before the start I have a lot of digital photos of reference, so that when it comes time to get all pieces that I have some idea where they then have to go all back together again. I also wrote a spreadsheet. I use the overview of all components that are removed from the vehicle to hold. In this way the components are known, the number of reported storage box and the field position is recorded and the necessary work has also been observed, so that at the end of the restoration of all components should be complete and ready to assemble the machine again.

I also read many books in the context of the two, I can recommend as they happen in step by step details and photos of the restoration of a Triumph Spitfire.

I raised the Spitfire in the garage ready to go, the first step to avoid the battery was, sparks or the short circuit while working on the car.

The Spitfire was designed with a separate chassis and an engine hood, front-hinged piece that gives unparalleled access to the area of the engine compartment.


Triumph Spitfire Cars Models Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 3

Triumph Spitfire Cars Models Triumph Spitfire MK IV Restoration Parts 3


Triumph Spitfire cars
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Triumph Spitfire Cars MK IV

Triumph Spitfire Cars MK IV

Restoration Triumph Cars Parts 3

After the drive shaft was repaired and the interior back together, it was time for a test drive. What felt a difference the whole Triumph Spitfire cars is much smoother at all speeds and was able to cruise at 65 mph without any problems.

A job that has traditionally required you to have all the classics I heard, to change the water hoses. It does not cost much to do and can really help with all the reliability on a hot summer day. I bought the pipe from the Moss kit for about £ 25 with carriers. Not only the movement of the pipes to improve the reliability, but it gives you the chance to wash the cooling system. After removal of the tubes I have a hose that ran clear through the radiator, heater matrix and the engine block to the water. An engine flush could be used at this point to further purification of the engine, but as a complete restoration in the works, this is not considered necessary.

I put on new pipes and tightened the clamps. (TIP: If the pipes are too narrow a measure to try them under the "hot water at the edges soft work)

The system was filled then mixed with water and antifreeze / summer coolant in perspective. I ran the engine until hot, and check for leaks and air pockets before switching off the engine and check the level. I ran the Triumph Spitfire cars for a few days and check the level again and further strengthen their ties.

During the summer I had about 2000 miles without problems, I enjoyed driving both the date of restoration on and on making the rear.

I had a week and a half of vacation for Christmas and I decided it was time to make a beginning, but as always my best plans do not come out. My wife is a "modern car" died on Christmas Eve and was towed into the garage for repair. but as it was Christmas Eve, there was no option can not be repaired so that the Triumph Spitfire cars was in operation again (see below Picture Triumph Spitfire cars between Christmas and New Year) called before the new year delay in the recovery plans even more. On the positive side, I can say that I drove the Triumph Spitfire cars for two years.